Sunday, February 22, 2015

March 6: Cleveland - Banks To The Future: The Legal Frontier Of International Finance

Title:
Banks To The Future: The Legal Frontier Of International Finance
When/Where:
Friday, March 6, 2015
1:00pm - 4:45pm
Moot Court Room
Cleveland-Marshall College of Law
Cleveland State University
1801 Euclid Ave
Cleveland, Ohio 44115
Speakers:
Credit:
3.5 hours
By:
Cleveland-Marshall College of Law / Cleveland State University
Cost:
Free
More Information (Preregistration Not Required):

  • 1:00: Welcome and Introductory Remarks by Mark J. Sundahl, Associate Dean for Administration and Professor of Law, Cleveland State University, Cleveland-Marshall College of Law.
  • 1:15: Crowdfunding, Cryptocurrencies, and International Business Ethics: Follow the “Money” by David Groshoff, senior VP & Chief Legal Officer at Dreamfund. Groshoff earned his J.D., M.B.A., and Ed.M from the Ohio State University, Northern Kentucky University, and Harvard University respectively.
  • 2:05: Banks, Customer Identification, and the Search for the Bad Guys, by Richard Gordon, professor of law at Case Western Reserve University and Director of Financial Integrity Programs at Brown University. Gordon received a B.A. from Yale University and JD from Harvard University. Prior to coming to Cleveland, he practiced international tax law at the now defunct firm of Dewey Ballantine, and taught at Harvard Law School.
  • 3:05: Money in Politics, the Roberts Court, and International Law: A Growing Divide, by Timothy K. Kuhner, associate professor at Georgia State University College of Law. Kuhner’s scholarship has been cited in the Yale Law Journal, Harvard Law Review, Duke Law Journal, NYU Law Review and the American Journal of Comparative Law. He received his J.D. and LL.M., magna cum laude, from Duke University School of Law.
  • 3:55: Economic Sanctions: Opportunities and Compliance Challenges, by Jon P. Yormick, an international business and trade lawyer, practicing from offices in Buffalo and Cleveland. Yormick has represented U.S. and foreign clients before the U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Industry and Security, the U.S. Customs and Border Protection, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the U.S. Department of State, Directorate of Defense Trade Controls, the U.S. Department of Treasury, Office of Foreign Assets Control, and the U.S. International Trade Commission.