Wednesday, April 29, 2015

June 4: London - Reputational Risks for Employers - Key Legal Issues

The Jeremy Clarkson saga, recent press coverage of employers evading train fares and regular stories about inappropriate tweets highlight the reputational risks that can arise from employment issues. Inappropriate conduct in the workplace of an individual with a high external profile, misguided use of social media and misconduct unconnected with the employee's duties but which may bring the employer into disrepute, can present employers with challenging legal and reputational issues as can litigation involving newsworthy claims.
Even if the issues leading to an employee's dismissal do not attract attention immediately, the fact that they may be played out in a subsequent employment tribunal case can also cause concern since the litigation may attract untoward press attention, especially if the case involves lurid allegations.
An awareness of the legal issues which can arise, together with practical steps which can be taken to protect the employer’s position, can enable employers proactively and effectively to handle situations which can involve PR risks and potential exposure to claims.
Topics to be addressed at this seminar will include:
  • Social media use and abuse
  • When conduct outside work can justify dismissal
  • When reputational risk to the employer can justify dismissal
  • Handling senior departures – voluntary and involuntary
  • Publicity arising from the litigation process and witness evidence – press coverage and restricted reporting orders
  • Handling the PR aspects of employment litigation
Title:
Reputational Risks for Employers - Key Legal Issues
A Seminar Presented by Dechert's Employment Team
When/Where:
June 4, 2015
5:00 PM - 6:00 PM
London
Speakers:
  • Charles Wynn-Evans
  • Emma Byford
  • Jonathan Hawker, Slate Campaigns
By:
Dechert
Credit:
The event sponsor does not appear to have applied for CLE credit. However the subject matter and speaker appear to meet the standards for attendees to apply for credit in some jurisdictions.
Cost:
No charge