Wednesday, November 23, 2016

February 2017: Seattle - Moot Court Judging - Register Now for #MCLE

Mock Trial and Moot Court Competitions provide an invaluable service to our students in preparing them to be better advocates, and we cannot hold them without you. We welcome attorneys from all practice areas to participate.
As a judge, you will provide feedback and evaluate the participants’ performance. We will provide you with details regarding the problem and fact pattern in advance of the competition. Judging for a MCHB competition is an opportunity to provide law students with valuable feedback on their trial advocacy skills. Volunteer judges are also invaluable to the continued success of the Moot Court Honor Board and the in-house competition program.
Title:
2017 Seattle Moot Court Judging
When/Where:
February 2017
University of Washington School of Law
Seattle, WA
  • Round 1: Saturday, February 11, 9:45am to 1:30pm
  • Round 2: Saturday, February 11, 2:30pm to 6:15pm
  • Round 3: Sunday, February 12, 8:30am to 12:15pm
  • Round 4: Sunday, February 12, 1:15pm to 5:00pm
Register now
Credit Et Cetera:
For your service as a judge, you receive:
  • 3 free CLE credits per competition or, 5.5 credits for judging both (conditions apply);*
  • Detailed instructions on the case and relevant legal points;
  • Training before the trial;
  • Free parking;
  • Dinner;
  • A chance to help mold the next generation of lawyers; and
  • MCHB’s heartfelt gratitude!
Credit:
Each round of competition entails a time commitment of substantive work (training, listening to competition rounds, grading and delivering feedback) of approximately 3 to 3.5 hours. WBSA regulations restrict the number of CLE credits you may receive for judging moot court competitions to 6 CLE credits per three-year reporting period. Note that you will receive 3 credits if you judge one round, but 5.5 if you judge a round in both competitions. This is because pre-competition training counts for .5 credits, but it is identical for both competitions, and so cannot be counted twice.
By:
Moot Court Honor Board at the University of Washington School of Law