Saturday, July 12, 2014

July 14: Webcast - Early Minnesota Legal History

Richard Clem
Lawyers generally don't think of themselves as historians, but we frequently do the work of historians. We seek out historical events (which we call "precedents") and try to apply these historical lessons to current situations. Minnesota's legal history has a long pedigree, dating back to the Northwest Ordinance of 1787. These antecedents give our laws a "chain of title" that is sometimes ignored. Some of the historical antecedents we'll look at are merely interesting "old cases" with little practical application. But others come under the heading of "venerable precedents", which can sometimes make an argument more compelling. And in a few cases, the law as it existed prior to statehood was arguably enshrined into the state constitution, in which case it takes on special significance.
Course materials for this program are available at this link.
Title:
Early Minnesota Legal History
When/Where:
July 14: 
Telephone Conference Call
By:
Richard Clem Continuing Legal Education
Cost:
No cost. If, however, you wish to make a small voluntary payment, you may do so after the program. See Why Is This Program Free?
Credit:

  • One CLE credit will be applied for in Minnesota and Wisconsin (Minnesota event code 193923).
  • Iowa credit is not available for this program.
  • In addition:

    • Alaska: Alaska Bar members may claim credit for attendance at CLE programs offered in or from other states if the program has been accredited by another MCLE jurisdiction
    • Arizona: The State Bar of Arizona does not accredit programs for the MCLE requirement. The Rules and Regulations are predicated on the assumption that attorneys can evaluate CLE activities offered based on the guidelines and report their activities by affidavit.
    • Arkansas: Upon receipt of a completed certificate of attendance form confirming attendance at an out-of-state continuing legal education program approved by the situs state, the attorney shall be entitled to CLE credits in Arkansas.
    • California: Program is eligible for California CLE credit only if the attorney is calling in from outside of California. The program cannot be taken for California credit if you call in from California.
    • Colorado: Colorado attorneys should submit a Colorado Affidavit form along with a statement certifying that the CLE program is accredited in another mandatory CLE state.
    • Florida: Courses approved by other state bars are generally acceptable for use toward satisfying CLE requirement but attorneys must first submit a CLE Application for Course Attendance Credit.
    • Hawaii: Program is eligible for Hawaii CLE credit only if the attorney is calling in from outside of Hawaii. The program cannot be taken for Hawaii credit if you call in from Hawaii.
    • Maine: Credit hours for activities approved by another MCLE state will be accepted for identical credit by the Board of Overseers of the Bar in Maine upon the Board's receipt of evidence of such certification as issued by that state
    • Minnesota: 1.0 CLE credit applied for 
    • Montana: Montana will honor the approval given by other CLE jurisdictions. Simply attach documentation of the other state's approval to your affidavit at the end of the reporting year.
    • New Jersey: New Jersey attorneys who are taking courses approved for CLE by another state will receive 1:1 credit for courses approved in that jurisdiction through reciprocity.
    • New York: Attorneys may claim New York CLE hours for programs accredited in Indiana or Wisconsin.
    • Wisconsin: 1.0 CLE credit applied for.
    • Other States: CLE credit is available in some other states if the participating attorney applies for credit. Consult your credit-granting authority.
Speaker:
Richard P. Clem is an attorney and continuing legal education (CLE) provider in Minnesota. He has been in private practice in the Twin Cities for 25 years. He has a J.D., cum laude, from Hamline University School of Law in St. Paul and a B.A. in History from the University of Minnesota. His reported cases include: Asociacion Nacional de Pescadores a Pequena Escala o Artesanales de Colombia v. Dow Quimica de Colombia, 988 F.2d 559, rehearing denied, 5 F.3d 530 (5th Cir. 1993), cert. denied, 510 U.S. 1041 (1994); LaMott v. Apple Valley Health Care Center, 465 N.W.2d 585 (Minn. Ct. App. 1991); Abo el Ela v. State, 468 N.W.2d 580 (Minn. Ct. App. 1991).